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Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

2 edition of Some references to the effect of ridging and terracing on soil and water conservation (1969-1957). found in the catalog.

Some references to the effect of ridging and terracing on soil and water conservation (1969-1957).

Commonwealth Bureau of Soils.

Some references to the effect of ridging and terracing on soil and water conservation (1969-1957).

by Commonwealth Bureau of Soils.

  • 319 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by The Bureau in Harpenden .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesBibliography -- 1333
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18948637M

Producers must consider the advantage and disadvantages of a tillage system before changing systems. The most important advantage of conservation tillage systems is significantly less soil erosion due to wind and water. Other advantages include reduced fuel and labor requirements. However, increased reliance may be placed on herbicides with some conservation tillage. Soil. The soil is the top layer of the earth’s is made up of dirt and rock. It is filled with air and life. A variety of organisms, like insects, earthworm, live in plants, soil serves as a storehouse of water and minerals needed for their growth. It also provides shelter to many animals that live on or in the soil.

Pre-independence soil and water conservation in Zimbabwe. Soil and water conservation in Zimbabwe (formerly Rhodesia) dates back to the early ′ s following the introduction of the plough and permanent settlements. The plough was introduced around ′ s following the arrival of white settlers. The introduction of permanent settlements and the plough also saw the abandonment of.   The book deals with several aspects of soil erosion, focusing on its connection with the agricultural world. Chapters’ topics are various, ranging from irrigation practices to soil nutrient, land use changes or tillage methodologies. The book is subdivided into fourteen chapters, sorted in four sections, grouping different facets of the topic: introductive case studies, erosion.

climate and permanent soil characteristics on risks of soil damage, limitations in use, productive capacity, and soil management require- ments. Slope, soil texture, soil depth, effects of past erosion, perme- ability, water-holding capacity, type of clay minerals, and the many other similar features are considered permanent soil qualities and. Length. Gravity and water play a major role when it comes to a slope's overall length. Although a slope may have a gentle angle, a long length will also affect the soil.


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Some references to the effect of ridging and terracing on soil and water conservation (1969-1957) by Commonwealth Bureau of Soils. Download PDF EPUB FB2

This bulletin describes terracing methods that are able to combat soil erosion and conserve water. There are three types of terraces (drainage, absorptive, and bench) and plans, specifications, construction practices are provided in the by: 1.

However there are some indigenous water spreading schemes, and examples from the Sahelian belt are reported by Pacey (), stretching from Southern Mauritania and Niger to Sudan and Somalia.

Other examples of indigenous soil and water conservation methods in Africa south of the Sahara are given in a study commissioned by IFAD (). Some applications of stone lines have the primary objective of water harvesting rather than soil conservation.

Run-off from uncropped land hig- her up the slope runs down onto the cropland, and is spread by the perme- able stone lines along with the run-off which starts on the cropland. Soil erosion, use of chemical pesticides and herbicides, unsustainable agricultural practices, excessive farming, water pollution and land pollution are some of the aspects upsetting the natural functions of the soil.

This is where soil conservation comes in. Soil conservation is the practice of protecting the soil against erosion or deterioration. Conservation tillage is commonly used in regions affected by water and wind erosion. To understand the effects of conservation tillage on soil nutrients and Cited by: Soil conservation stores more of the runoff from excess rainfall in the reservoir of the soil for subsequent crop use; and this much water is kept out of streams, thereby contributing to flood reduction.

Today these techniques of soil and water conservation are being prac- ticed in many countries with much benefit to great numbers of people. The soil water content was continuously measured during 8 days in each month of July and August.

As shown in Fig 4, it can be concluded that micro-basin tillage had a significant positive effect on soil water retention in sloping land. From July 19 to 26, the soil water content over a depth of 0–20 cm of the control plot went down from 39% to.

Conservation Practices. Technical guides are the primary scientific references for NRCS. They contain technical information about the conservation of soil, water, air, and related plant and animal resources. Technical guides used in each field office are localized so that they apply specifically to the geographic area for which they are prepared.

(b) Counter terracing. i.e., to construct a channel along the slope to intercept and divert the runoff water. This may be: (i) Channel terrace, i.e., to dig channels at suitable intervals and the excavated soil deposited as a wide, lower edge along the lower edge of the channel.

Fortunately for the proponents of conservation agriculture, its net financial impact at the individual farm scale appears positive as well.

Since the seminal work of Crosson (), numerous financial analyses of conservation tillage adoption, whether in a developed world (e.g. Stonehouse, ) or developing world (e.g. Sorrenson,Sorrenson et al., ) context, have shown that it. soil-structure to enhance water-holding capacity of soil itself.

The implementation of water-conservation techniques on the basis of bench terrace’s achievement on water and soil conservation has played an important role in promoting continuous sustainable production and protecting environment. Land degradation is one of the major threats to food security and natural resources conservation Zikre watershed.

The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of land use types, management practices and slope classes on soil physico-chemical properties. Results of the experiment indicated highest mean values of total nitrogen (%), organic matter (%) and cation exchange.

Terrace cultivation, method of growing crops on sides of hills or mountains by planting on graduated terraces built into the slope. Though labor-intensive, the method has been employed effectively to maximize arable land area in variable terrains and to reduce soil erosion and water loss.

The effects of minimal tillage and contour cultivation on surface runoff, soil loss and crop yield in the long-term Woburn Erosion Reference Experiment on sandy soil at Woburn, England Article Sep.

The major benefit, of course, is the conservation of soil and water. Terraces reduce both the amount and velocity of water moving across the soil surface, which greatly reduces soil erosion.

Terracing thus permits more intensive cropping than would otherwise be possible. While the distribution of terraces varied across continents (Fig. 1, Table 1), most often terracing practices were found in regions where agricultural civilization firstly earliest practices of terracing were recorded in Palestine and Yemen about years ago (Barker et al.,Abu Hammad and Børresen, ).They appeared almost at the same time as the rise of agricultural.

water harvesting and conservation. Water harvesting techniques gather water from an area termed the ‘catchment area’ and channel it to the cropping area or wherever it is required.

Conservation techniques conserve water within the biomass and the soil by reducing run-off and keeping the water where it falls, as much as possible.

Objectives: The stone bund reduces and stops the velocity of runoff and consequently reduces soil erosion and the steady decline in fertility and crop are semi-permeable structures unless sealed with soil in their upper side. They increase the moisture retention capacity of the soil profile and water availability to plants, and increase the efficiency of fertilizer applications if any.

Examples of terracing patterns are observable from Google Maps at GPS reference: 18°08'″S 32°38'″E which is the position of the Ziwa Site Museum. The area lies in rain shadow and there are few perennial streams, so terracing is a good water conservation method.

Soil erosion and nutrient depletion have been the major challenges in Ethiopia that adversely affect soil fertility and crop productivity. With the aim of curbing land degradation problems, efforts are underway on the implementation of soil and water conservation (SWC) practices.

This research investigated the effects of SWC practices on soil properties and crop productivity in.

Conservation of soil and water resources is important for sustainability of agriculture and environment. Soil and water resources are under immense pressure due to ever increasing population.Physical soil conservation measures Physical soil conservation structures are permanent features made of earth, stones or masonry, designed to protect the soil from uncontrolled runoff and erosion and retain water where needed.

• Selection and design of structures depend on: • Climate and the need to retain or discharge the runoff.with graphical methods for designing conservation channels, are pre- sented in this handbook. The purpose is to furnish technicians of the Soil Conservation Service with the most recent and complete information to aid them in the design of channels to be lined with vegetation.